ecowatchorg:

NASA Showcases Beauty of National Parks in Awesome Aerial Images
While the images show distinct features that make these landscapes one-of-a-kind, they can’t speak to the amazing impact these places have on our wellbeing and our economy.
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/06/national-parks-nasa-aerial-images/

ecowatchorg:

NASA Showcases Beauty of National Parks in Awesome Aerial Images

While the images show distinct features that make these landscapes one-of-a-kind, they can’t speak to the amazing impact these places have on our wellbeing and our economy.

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/06/national-parks-nasa-aerial-images/

bobbycaputo:

Geotagged Wildlife Photos Help Poachers Kill Endangered Animals

If you care about endangered animals that are hunted for their parts, here’s something important you should keep in mind: make sure you scrub the GPS data on the images prior to sharing them online. Poachers have reportedly been turning to geotagged photos on social networks in order to find out where they can make their next kill.

A photograph that has recently been making the rounds on the Web shows a sign that has been put up at an undisclosed reserve. It reads:

Please be careful when sharing photos on social media. They can lead poachers to our rhino

Turn off geotag function and do not disclose where the photo was taken

(Continue Reading)

(via shychemist)

sexience:

if u don’t think this is important then u r wrong

sexience:

if u don’t think this is important then u r wrong

wapiti3:

General Swiss Society for the whole science on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Publication info Neuchatel [Switzerland] :Schweizerische Gesellschaft für die Gesammten Naturwissenschaften,1837-1906
Contributing Library:
American Museum of Natural History Library
Biodiversity Heritage Library

(via scientificillustration)

@
"No one there understood why the police attacked. Before then, police hadn’t discouraged protesters from walking down Florissant Avenue. The midnight curfew was hours away. Prior to the police attack, neither I, nor anyone with whom I spoke, had seen any violation of the law. The only violence I witnessed resulted from a disproportionate and relentless assault by an unnecessarily militarized police force."

I was on the front lines of the violence in Ferguson. Militarized police caused the chaos. - The Washington Post (via wilwheaton)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

awkwardsituationist:

thirty kilometers from bangkok in the suburb of bang bua thong is a half built housing complex abandoned by developers during the asian economic crisis of 1997 and now occupied by over 1500 squatters and several domesticated elephants.

to supplement income when the rice growing season ends, many farmers will relocate to the suburbs of bangkok with their elephants to live, venturing out to the capital to offer tourists the opportunity to feed the animals in exchange for a few dollars.

although it is illegal to bring elephants into the city, the combination of poverty in thailand’s rural areas, the loss of the elephant’s natural habitat, the resulting threat of starvation (elephants eat a couple hundred kilos of food a day, and it is difficult for impoverished farmers to make up for what nature can no longer provide), and the elephants’ special status in thai history means that most thais are sympathetic and turn a blind eye. that said, these underlying problems also go overlooked.

story (“the urban jungle” and “the elephant in the room”) and photos by brent lewin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poverty

http://www.globalissues.org/issue/2/causes-of-poverty

wonderous-world:

Green Lake is located in Tragöss Austria. In spring snowmelt raises the lake level about 10 meters. This phenomenon, which lasts only a few weeks, covers the hiking trails, meadows, trees and everything in between. The result is magical to watch diving landscapes. Photos by Marc Henauer for National Geographic [Article and Video]

(via wonderous-world)

sci-universe:

The planet we live on, with all its natural spectacularity, is probably the most magnificent thing we can ever experience.

(GIFs: headlikeanorange, gifdrome, sci-universe)

ancientpeoples:

Limestone sphinx of Queen Hatsepsut 
Queen Hatsepsut crowned herself queen after taking regency for her infant stepson Thutmoses III. She shows herself as a man, including her beard. She did this because a queen could officially not rule the country (Horus was the king on earth). 
It is 63.5 cm high, 106.7 cm long and 33 cm wide ( 25 x 42 x 13 inch.) 
Found in Upper Egypt, Thebes, temple of Hatsepsut at Deir el Bahri in 1926-28. 
Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, Reign of Hatsepsut/Thutmoses III, 1479 - 1458 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatsepsut

ancientpeoples:

Limestone sphinx of Queen Hatsepsut 

Queen Hatsepsut crowned herself queen after taking regency for her infant stepson Thutmoses III. She shows herself as a man, including her beard. She did this because a queen could officially not rule the country (Horus was the king on earth). 

It is 63.5 cm high, 106.7 cm long and 33 cm wide ( 25 x 42 x 13 inch.) 

Found in Upper Egypt, Thebes, temple of Hatsepsut at Deir el Bahri in 1926-28. 

Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, Reign of Hatsepsut/Thutmoses III, 1479 - 1458 BC. 

Source: Metropolitan Museum

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatsepsut

earthstory:

This how sperm whales sleep!This image, which was taken by Magnus Lundgren, opens us up to the world of cetacean neuroscience. Up until only a few years ago (2008), marine biologists presumed that sperm whales behaved liked other cetaceans and utilised uni-hemispheric sleep; allowing one side of their brain to rest at a time. You can imagine the advantages of only allowing one side of your brain to rest, it certainly facilitates awareness of predators and going to the surface for air- but these sperm whales don’t seem to need that security.The researchers discovered that when they happened upon a pod of vertically bobbing sperm whales, not a single whale responded to their presence. However, when a whale was nudged, they suddenly became reactive and fled the scene.After tracking numerous whales, the team’s findings suggest that, unlike other cetaceans, sperm whales appear to enter short, but periodic, bouts of sleep while vertically drifting below the surface.-JeanYou can read more detail here: http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080221/full/news.2008.613.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperm_whale

earthstory:

This how sperm whales sleep!

This image, which was taken by Magnus Lundgren, opens us up to the world of cetacean neuroscience. Up until only a few years ago (2008), marine biologists presumed that sperm whales behaved liked other cetaceans and utilised uni-hemispheric sleep; allowing one side of their brain to rest at a time. You can imagine the advantages of only allowing one side of your brain to rest, it certainly facilitates awareness of predators and going to the surface for air- but these sperm whales don’t seem to need that security.

The researchers discovered that when they happened upon a pod of vertically bobbing sperm whales, not a single whale responded to their presence. However, when a whale was nudged, they suddenly became reactive and fled the scene.

After tracking numerous whales, the team’s findings suggest that, unlike other cetaceans, sperm whales appear to enter short, but periodic, bouts of sleep while vertically drifting below the surface.

-Jean

You can read more detail here: http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080221/full/news.2008.613.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperm_whale

astrodidact:

PASADENA, Calif. — The intensity of the jets of water ice and organic particles that shoot out from Saturn’s moon Enceladus depends on the moon’s proximity to the ringed planet, according to data obtained by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.
The finding adds to evidence that a liquid water reservoir or ocean lurks under the icy surface of the moon. This is the first clear observation the bright plume emanating from Enceladus’ south pole varies predictably. The findings are detailed in a scientific paper in this week’s edition of Nature.
"The jets of Enceladus apparently work like adjustable garden hose nozzles," said Matt Hedman, the paper’s lead author and a Cassini team scientist based at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. "The nozzles are almost closed when Enceladus is closer to Saturn and are most open when the moon is farthest away. We think this has to do with how Saturn squeezes and releases the moon with its gravity."
Cassini, which has been orbiting Saturn since 2004, discovered the jets that form the plume in 2005. The water ice and organic particles spray out from several narrow fissures nicknamed “tiger stripes.”
"The way the jets react so responsively to changing stresses on Enceladus suggests they have their origins in a large body of liquid water," said Christophe Sotin, a co-author and Cassini team member at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "Liquid water was key to the development of life on Earth, so these discoveries whet the appetite to know whether life exists everywhere water is present."
For years scientists hypothesized the intensity of the jets likely varied over time, but no one had been able to show they changed in a recognizable pattern. Hedman and colleagues were able to see the changes by examining infrared data of the plume as a whole, obtained by Cassini’s visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS), and looking at data gathered over a long period of time.
The VIMS instrument, which enables the analysis of a wide range of data including the hydrocarbon composition of the surface of another Saturnian moon, Titan, and the seismological signs of Saturn’s vibrations in its rings, collected more than 200 images of the Enceladus plume from 2005 to 2012. These data show the plume was dimmest when the moon was at the closest point in its orbit to Saturn. The plume gradually brightened until Enceladus was at the most distant point, where it was three to four times brighter than the dimmest detection. This is comparable to moving from a dim hallway into a brightly lit office.
Adding the brightness data to previous models of how Saturn squeezes Enceladus, the scientists deduced the stronger gravitational squeeze near the planet reduces the opening of the tiger stripes and the amount of material spraying out. They think the relaxing of Saturn’s gravity farther away from planet allows the tiger stripes to be more open and for the spray to escape in larger quantities.
"Cassini’s time at Saturn has shown us how active and kaleidoscopic this planet, its rings and its moons are," said Linda Spilker, Cassini project scientist at JPL. "We’ve come a long way from the placid-looking Saturn that Galileo first spied through his telescope. We hope to learn more about the forces at work here as a microcosm for how our solar system formed."
The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The VIMS team is based at the University of Arizona in Tucson.
For more information about the Cassini mission, visit:  http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov .
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/whycassini/cassini-sees-forces-controlling-enceladus-jets/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enceladus_%28moon%29

astrodidact:

PASADENA, Calif. — The intensity of the jets of water ice and organic particles that shoot out from Saturn’s moon Enceladus depends on the moon’s proximity to the ringed planet, according to data obtained by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.

The finding adds to evidence that a liquid water reservoir or ocean lurks under the icy surface of the moon. This is the first clear observation the bright plume emanating from Enceladus’ south pole varies predictably. The findings are detailed in a scientific paper in this week’s edition of Nature.

"The jets of Enceladus apparently work like adjustable garden hose nozzles," said Matt Hedman, the paper’s lead author and a Cassini team scientist based at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. "The nozzles are almost closed when Enceladus is closer to Saturn and are most open when the moon is farthest away. We think this has to do with how Saturn squeezes and releases the moon with its gravity."

Cassini, which has been orbiting Saturn since 2004, discovered the jets that form the plume in 2005. The water ice and organic particles spray out from several narrow fissures nicknamed “tiger stripes.”

"The way the jets react so responsively to changing stresses on Enceladus suggests they have their origins in a large body of liquid water," said Christophe Sotin, a co-author and Cassini team member at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "Liquid water was key to the development of life on Earth, so these discoveries whet the appetite to know whether life exists everywhere water is present."

For years scientists hypothesized the intensity of the jets likely varied over time, but no one had been able to show they changed in a recognizable pattern. Hedman and colleagues were able to see the changes by examining infrared data of the plume as a whole, obtained by Cassini’s visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS), and looking at data gathered over a long period of time.

The VIMS instrument, which enables the analysis of a wide range of data including the hydrocarbon composition of the surface of another Saturnian moon, Titan, and the seismological signs of Saturn’s vibrations in its rings, collected more than 200 images of the Enceladus plume from 2005 to 2012.
These data show the plume was dimmest when the moon was at the closest point in its orbit to Saturn. The plume gradually brightened until Enceladus was at the most distant point, where it was three to four times brighter than the dimmest detection. This is comparable to moving from a dim hallway into a brightly lit office.

Adding the brightness data to previous models of how Saturn squeezes Enceladus, the scientists deduced the stronger gravitational squeeze near the planet reduces the opening of the tiger stripes and the amount of material spraying out. They think the relaxing of Saturn’s gravity farther away from planet allows the tiger stripes to be more open and for the spray to escape in larger quantities.

"Cassini’s time at Saturn has shown us how active and kaleidoscopic this planet, its rings and its moons are," said Linda Spilker, Cassini project scientist at JPL. "We’ve come a long way from the placid-looking Saturn that Galileo first spied through his telescope. We hope to learn more about the forces at work here as a microcosm for how our solar system formed."

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The VIMS team is based at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

For more information about the Cassini mission, visit:  http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov .

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/whycassini/cassini-sees-forces-controlling-enceladus-jets/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enceladus_%28moon%29

(via fuckyeah-stars)