space-pics:

Vostok Spacecrafthttp://space-pics.tumblr.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_Gagarin

Tags: hell yeah

comedycentral:

Click here for more of Jon Stewart’s coverage of the recent House Committee on Science, Space and Technology hearing.

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

lensblr-network:

Auf Sand gebaut • Built on sand
Der Leuchtturm auf der Wanderdüne Rubjerg Knude wird eines Tages in die Nordsee stürzen … • The lighthouse on the shifting sand dune Rubjerg Knude will fall one day into the North Sea …
by Fotostopp  (fotostopp.tumblr.com)

lensblr-network:

Auf Sand gebaut • Built on sand

Der Leuchtturm auf der Wanderdüne Rubjerg Knude wird eines Tages in die Nordsee stürzen … • The lighthouse on the shifting sand dune Rubjerg Knude will fall one day into the North Sea …

ecowatchorg:

7 Places With Unexpected Forest Restoration Potential
The world has lost almost half of its original forest cover, due largely to booming population growth and agricultural expansion. But even though these forests are gone, there is still a tremendous amount of underutilized and unproductive land that has the potential to provide valuable ecosystem services if trees are returned to the landscape.
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/31/7-places-forest-restoration/

ecowatchorg:

7 Places With Unexpected Forest Restoration Potential

The world has lost almost half of its original forest cover, due largely to booming population growth and agricultural expansion. But even though these forests are gone, there is still a tremendous amount of underutilized and unproductive land that has the potential to provide valuable ecosystem services if trees are returned to the landscape.

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/31/7-places-forest-restoration/

scienceisbeauty:

The always impressive power of nature. Eruption of the Sangeang Api volcano in Indonesia. Images via CIMSS Satellite Blog (gif) and MailOnLine.

currentsinbiology:

10 fascinating facts about woolly mammoths
Contrary to common belief, the woolly mammoth was hardly mammoth in size. They were roughly about the size of modern African elephants. .
The ears of a woolly mammoth were shorter than the modern elephant’s ears.  .
Scientists can discern a woolly mammoth’s age from the rings of its tusk, like looking at the rings of a tree. .
The woolly mammoth was not the only “woolly” type of animal. .
Cave paintings drawn by ice age humans show the important relationship they had with the woolly mammoths. .
Today, the hunt is on for woolly mammoth tusks in the Arctic Siberia. .
The first fully documented woolly mammoth skeleton was discovered in 1799. .
The coat of a woolly mammoth consisted of a “guard” of foot long hairs, and an undercoat of shorter hairs. .
Even a kid can discover a preserved mammoth.  In September 2012 in Russia, an 11-year-old boy named Yevgeny “Zhenya” Salinder happened upon an extremely well-preserved woolly mammoth carcass while walking his dogs.  .
The final resting place of woolly mammoths was Wrangel Island in the Arctic.  A small population of 500-1000 woolly mammoths lived there until 1650 BC.

More at TED Blog

currentsinbiology:

10 fascinating facts about woolly mammoths

  1. Contrary to common belief, the woolly mammoth was hardly mammoth in size. They were roughly about the size of modern African elephants.
    .
  2. The ears of a woolly mammoth were shorter than the modern elephant’s ears
    .
  3. Scientists can discern a woolly mammoth’s age from the rings of its tusk, like looking at the rings of a tree.
    .
  4. The woolly mammoth was not the only “woolly” type of animal.
    .
  5. Cave paintings drawn by ice age humans show the important relationship they had with the woolly mammoths.
    .
  6. Today, the hunt is on for woolly mammoth tusks in the Arctic Siberia.
    .
  7. The first fully documented woolly mammoth skeleton was discovered in 1799.
    .
  8. The coat of a woolly mammoth consisted of a “guard” of foot long hairs, and an undercoat of shorter hairs.
    .
  9. Even a kid can discover a preserved mammoth.  In September 2012 in Russia, an 11-year-old boy named Yevgeny “Zhenya” Salinder happened upon an extremely well-preserved woolly mammoth carcass while walking his dogs. 
    .
  10. The final resting place of woolly mammoths was Wrangel Island in the Arctic.  A small population of 500-1000 woolly mammoths lived there until 1650 BC.

More at TED Blog

"Da mi basia mille, deinde centum,
dein mille altera, dein secunda centum,
deinde usque altera mille, deinde centum."

Gaius Valerius Catullus

Translation:

"Give me a thousand kisses, then a hundred,

then the next thousand, after that the second hundred,

after that the other thousand without stopping and finally hundred (more).”

(via konijnmayke)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catullus_5

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesbia

(Source: arbor-i)

ecowatchorg:

Dr. David Suzuki Discusses the War on Climate Scientists

This is a very effective thing that we know has been done by the tobacco industry [and] it’s being done by the fossil fuel industry… You attack a person on the basis of their trustworthiness, their ulterior motives, anything to get away from dealing with the issues”

SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/18/suzuki-climate-scientists

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_change

ecowatchorg:

Dr. David Suzuki Discusses the War on Climate Scientists

This is a very effective thing that we know has been done by the tobacco industry [and] it’s being done by the fossil fuel industry… You attack a person on the basis of their trustworthiness, their ulterior motives, anything to get away from dealing with the issues”

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/05/18/suzuki-climate-scientists

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_change

astronomy-to-zoology:

Kairuku grebneffi
…is an extinct species of “Giant Penguin” that lived in what is now New Zealand during the late Oligocene. K. grebneffi is one of the tallest and heaviest species of penguins that lived, with individuals reaching sizes of 1.5 meters (4.9 ft) long and weighing around 60 kilograms (130 lbs). Due to its size K. grebneffi was likely able to dive deeper and swim longer than modern penguins, however like modern penguins K. grebneffi most likely feed on fish and squid. During the late Oligocene the “new zealand” area was mostly ocean with rocky outcrops, which likely provided safe breeding grounds and easy access to food for K. grebneffi
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Sphenisciformes-Kairuku-K. grebneffi
Image: Chris Gaskin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_Penguin

astronomy-to-zoology:

Kairuku grebneffi

…is an extinct species of “Giant Penguin” that lived in what is now New Zealand during the late Oligocene. K. grebneffi is one of the tallest and heaviest species of penguins that lived, with individuals reaching sizes of 1.5 meters (4.9 ft) long and weighing around 60 kilograms (130 lbs). Due to its size K. grebneffi was likely able to dive deeper and swim longer than modern penguins, however like modern penguins K. grebneffi most likely feed on fish and squid. During the late Oligocene the “new zealand” area was mostly ocean with rocky outcrops, which likely provided safe breeding grounds and easy access to food for K. grebneffi

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Sphenisciformes-Kairuku-K. grebneffi

Image: Chris Gaskin

earthstory:

Puma YumcoThe uplifted plateau of Tibet has risen out of the Asian continent due to piston like tectonic forces from below resulting from the compression as India meets Eurasia in a slow motion collision. Many lakes, some with outlets to the sea and others without dot the plateau including this one snapped last winter as a mosaic from the International Space Station. Puma Yumco measures 31x14km .Sitting at just over 5,000 metres altitude it is low in nutrients and has clear blue water (due to the relative absence of life) , features it shares with many high altitude Himalayan lakes. Changes in colour are due to the depth rather than contents of the water. The white lines are patterns made by frozen blocks of ice as the lake passed through repeated cycles of freezing and fracturing, abetted by the howling winds.LozImage credit: NASA






http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Puma_Yumco

earthstory:

Puma Yumco

The uplifted plateau of Tibet has risen out of the Asian continent due to piston like tectonic forces from below resulting from the compression as India meets Eurasia in a slow motion collision. Many lakes, some with outlets to the sea and others without dot the plateau including this one snapped last winter as a mosaic from the International Space Station. Puma Yumco measures 31x14km .

Sitting at just over 5,000 metres altitude it is low in nutrients and has clear blue water (due to the relative absence of life) , features it shares with many high altitude Himalayan lakes. Changes in colour are due to the depth rather than contents of the water. The white lines are patterns made by frozen blocks of ice as the lake passed through repeated cycles of freezing and fracturing, abetted by the howling winds.

Loz


Image credit: NASA

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Puma_Yumco

awkwardsituationist:

photographer sebastian copeland has reached both poles on foot, traveling more than 8,000 kilometers across the arctic sea, greenland and antarctica (and setting four world records in the process), in order to document this disappearing landscape and highlight the effects of climate change.  

says copeland, “helping people fall in love with their world is a catalyst to wanting to save it. our actions here, in the industrialized world, are changing this fragile, beautiful landscape forever, and i wanted to ask people to think about that.” 

though to many the poles may seem unimportant in their remoteness, copeland notes, “the rapid changes in this stark yet fragile icy realm may sound the last warning before the destruction of our environment as we know it today.”

it was revealed this week, for example, that the eventual loss of a major section of west antarctica’s ice sheet — a region which contains enough ice to raise global sea levels by four feet — now appears unstoppable. 

(the trailer for copeland’s documentary, “into the cold, a journey of the soul”. see also camille seaman’s the last iceberg)

musts:

Chameleon_9946s by Angi Wallace