etherealvistas:

Milky Way in Mount Laguna (USA) by slworking2

(via scientificthought)

macrodan:

Hey everybody, it’s time for Caterpillar Week!!  That’s right, nothing but caterpillars all day, everyday this whole week.  Why?  I dunno, I guess I have a lot of pictures of caterpillars so why not!
Here we have a big fat Swallowtail caterpillar (Papilio polyxenes).  This will pupate into a cocoon and stay that way over the winter, and emerge as a butterfly in early spring.

macrodan:

Hey everybody, it’s time for Caterpillar Week!!  That’s right, nothing but caterpillars all day, everyday this whole week.  Why?  I dunno, I guess I have a lot of pictures of caterpillars so why not!

Here we have a big fat Swallowtail caterpillar (Papilio polyxenes).  This will pupate into a cocoon and stay that way over the winter, and emerge as a butterfly in early spring.

discoverynews:

Pluto May Have Deep Seas and Ancient Tectonic Faults
In July 2015, we get our first close look at the dwarf planet Pluto and its moon, Charon, a fact that has scientists hypothesizing more than ever about what we might see there. One of the latest ideas put forward is that perhaps the collision that likely formed Pluto and Charon heated the interior of Pluto enough to give it an internal liquid water ocean, which also gave the small world a short-lived plate tectonics system, like that of Earth. Read more

discoverynews:

Pluto May Have Deep Seas and Ancient Tectonic Faults

In July 2015, we get our first close look at the dwarf planet Pluto and its moon, Charon, a fact that has scientists hypothesizing more than ever about what we might see there. One of the latest ideas put forward is that perhaps the collision that likely formed Pluto and Charon heated the interior of Pluto enough to give it an internal liquid water ocean, which also gave the small world a short-lived plate tectonics system, like that of Earth. Read more

earthstory:

The EU created 23.4% of its electricity from renewable energy sources in 2012, with a total electrical output estimated at 763.5 TW. This represents an important increase from 2011, when these energy sources brought “only” 20.4 % of total electricity.
Austria and Sweden pave the way in what is possible for renewable energy with 68.3 and 67.1 % of their total electricity coming from renewables in 2012, respectively. The remaining 25 EU countries are following suit. Nine countries generated 20-50% of their electricity through renewables, including: Latvia (43.4%), Denmark (41.7%), Portugal (35.6%), Finland (32.5%), Spain (31.7%), Slovenia (29.5%), Italy (26.6%), Romania (25.2%) and Germany (24%).
In terms of the chosen technology, the statistics, taken from Euro Observer, have shown that hydropower represents 43.9 % of the total renewable energy produced in 2012. Wind follows with 26.6%, biomass (19.5%), and solar energy (9.2%). Geothermal and ocean energies make up the remaining 0.8 %. The renewable energy industry in the EU has employed more than 1.22 million people in 2012.
These figures show that the EU 27 are well on their way to achieving the 2020 goal of “20 % of renewable energy in the total energy consumption.”
We wish them luck.
-Jean
Source: http://www.energies-renouvelables.org/observ-er/stat_baro/barobilan/barobilan13-gb.pdf

earthstory:

The EU created 23.4% of its electricity from renewable energy sources in 2012, with a total electrical output estimated at 763.5 TW. This represents an important increase from 2011, when these energy sources brought “only” 20.4 % of total electricity.

Austria and Sweden pave the way in what is possible for renewable energy with 68.3 and 67.1 % of their total electricity coming from renewables in 2012, respectively. The remaining 25 EU countries are following suit. Nine countries generated 20-50% of their electricity through renewables, including: Latvia (43.4%), Denmark (41.7%), Portugal (35.6%), Finland (32.5%), Spain (31.7%), Slovenia (29.5%), Italy (26.6%), Romania (25.2%) and Germany (24%).

In terms of the chosen technology, the statistics, taken from Euro Observer, have shown that hydropower represents 43.9 % of the total renewable energy produced in 2012. Wind follows with 26.6%, biomass (19.5%), and solar energy (9.2%). Geothermal and ocean energies make up the remaining 0.8 %. The renewable energy industry in the EU has employed more than 1.22 million people in 2012.

These figures show that the EU 27 are well on their way to achieving the 2020 goal of “20 % of renewable energy in the total energy consumption.”

We wish them luck.

-Jean

Source: http://www.energies-renouvelables.org/observ-er/stat_baro/barobilan/barobilan13-gb.pdf

thenewenlightenmentage:

What Does Sound Look Like?When light passes between areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
In the mid-19th century, German physicist August Toepler invented a photography technique called Schlieren Flow Visualization to visually capture these changes in density. The setup is a bit hard to explain in words (watch the video above for a full explanation) but it allows scientists and engineers to see things that are normally invisible: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

What Does Sound Look Like?

When light passes between areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

In the mid-19th century, German physicist August Toepler invented a photography technique called Schlieren Flow Visualization to visually capture these changes in density. The setup is a bit hard to explain in words (watch the video above for a full explanation) but it allows scientists and engineers to see things that are normally invisible: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze.

Continue Reading

(via sci-universe)

worldwideexplorers:

Not all who wander are lost.  www.Explorers.com

Get your wanderlust on

worldwideexplorers:

Not all who wander are lost.  www.Explorers.com

Get your wanderlust on

amnhnyc:

"Shooting stars" are actually meteors. People once thought they were stars falling from the sky. These tiny grains of dust glow brightly in Earth’s atmosphere because they’re traveling so fast that they release a tremendous amount of energy. 
Meteorites can be huge or tiny. The biggest one ever found weighs around 60 tons, while others are the size of a grain of sand. 
All meteorites come from inside our solar system. Most of them are fragments of asteroids that broke apart long ago in the asteroid belt, located between Mars and Jupiter. 
Small pieces of the Moon occasionally reach Earth as meteorites. We know where they come from because they’re identical in composition to the lunar rocks collected by Apollo astronauts. 
Certain “primitive” meteorites contain the first solid material to form in our solar system. Researchers have used the age of this material—4.568 billion years—to determine the age of our solar system.
Learn much more in the Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites. 

amnhnyc:

  • "Shooting stars" are actually meteors. People once thought they were stars falling from the sky. These tiny grains of dust glow brightly in Earth’s atmosphere because they’re traveling so fast that they release a tremendous amount of energy. 
  • Meteorites can be huge or tiny. The biggest one ever found weighs around 60 tons, while others are the size of a grain of sand. 
  • All meteorites come from inside our solar system. Most of them are fragments of asteroids that broke apart long ago in the asteroid belt, located between Mars and Jupiter. 
  • Small pieces of the Moon occasionally reach Earth as meteorites. We know where they come from because they’re identical in composition to the lunar rocks collected by Apollo astronauts. 
  • Certain “primitive” meteorites contain the first solid material to form in our solar system. Researchers have used the age of this material—4.568 billion years—to determine the age of our solar system.

Learn much more in the Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites

tulipnight:

Last Brilliance by Andy 58
skunkbear:

nprontheroad:

In late July and August, something remarkable happens in the air above Lake Murray, South Carolina.  For the past 25 years, half a million purple martins (large swallows) have gathered on a small island in the hundreds of thousands.  This year, they didn’t show up.

This weekend Skunk Bear goes mobile! I’m down in South Carolina RIGHT NOW looking for the missing birds, and I’ll be chronicling the search over at NPR’s travelogue blog - nprontheroad.tumblr.com. You can read all about the mystery of the purple martins and the humans who love them over there.

skunkbear:

nprontheroad:

In late July and August, something remarkable happens in the air above Lake Murray, South Carolina.  For the past 25 years, half a million purple martins (large swallows) have gathered on a small island in the hundreds of thousands.  This year, they didn’t show up.

This weekend Skunk Bear goes mobile! I’m down in South Carolina RIGHT NOW looking for the missing birds, and I’ll be chronicling the search over at NPR’s travelogue blog - nprontheroad.tumblr.com. You can read all about the mystery of the purple martins and the humans who love them over there.

radivs:

Four Seasons in Switzerland by Robin Halioua

(via wonderous-world)

awkwardsituationist:

conservation photographer brian skerry photographs “highly curious” southern right whales (and his assistant, mauricio handler) in the auckland islands marine reserve, which protects an area 300 miles south of new zealand’s south island.

“i’ve been diving for about 30 years, and i can honestly say that i’ve had some amazing encounters with sharks, squids, and other whales. but the encounter with the right whales in the auckland islands was probably the best thing i’ve ever done. it was just that amazing,” said skerry.

"i was swimming alongside this huge whale, kicking as hard as i can to keep up…i tried to keep up with it as long as i could, but i had to take a break, so i stopped and kneeled down on the bottom. instead of continuing, the whale stops and turns and waits for me.

"after a while it would get bored and go back up to the surface, so i would ascend to kind of remind it that i was still around. it would see me, and i’d go back down. and sure enough, the whale would follow me. It was like swimming around with a friend."

to get the pictures of forty foot long whales, skerry said “i ended up for the most part ditching the strobes and shooting available light. that meant i had to shoot at very high speeds, iso’s of 800, which did not offer the best resolution - it tends to be a little noisy or grainy. but it was what i had to do to get pictures, because there was never a lot of light.”